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  110   Tue Oct 12 03:53:37 2010 Jinhong WangReference design for DRS4 active input buffer

Stefan Ritt wrote:

The design of high frequency differential input stages with the DRS4 is a challenge, since the chip draws quite some current at the input (up to 1 mA at 5 GSPS), which must be sourced by the input buffer. A simple transformer as used in the DRS4 Evaluation Board 2.0 limits the bandwidth to 220 MHz. In meantime two active input stages have been worked out and successfully been tested, both utilizing the THS4508 differential amplifier. The first design is AC-coupled and uses less power, the second design is DC-coupled and uses more power with the benefit of delivering a higher bandwidth.

Both designs use a clamping diode at the input as a protection against high voltage spikes at the input. We used a RCLAMP0502B diode from SEMTECH, but any fast voltage suppressor diode will do the job. 

The CMOFS input to the THS4508 set the common mode of the differential amplifier. In the AC version the level is set to mid-rail (2.5V), in the DC version it's set to 1.8V to match the input range of the DRS4.

The CAL+ and CAL- signals are used to bias the inputs to a well-defined DC level and can also be used to calibrate the chip. For bipolar inputs, they are both set to 0.8V. A positive 0.5V input pulse then drives DRS_IN+ to (0.8+0.25)V = 1.05V and DRS_IN- to (0.8-0.25)V = 0.55V. A negative 0.5V pulse then drives then DRS_IN+ to 0.55V and DRS_IN- to 1.05V. With ROFS=1.6V, the full dynamic range of the DRS4 is then used. Note that the THS4508 has a gain of 2, and the input has a -6dB voltage divider to compensate for that. To use other input ranges, such as -1V...0V, the CAL+ and CAL- signals can be adjusted accordingly. Note that the inputs of the DRS4 must always be between 0.1V and 1.5V.

 

AC-coupled version

ac.png
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     (click to enlarge)

Power supply: +5 V 40 mA

Bandwidth (-3dB): 600 MHz

CMOFS: 2.5 V

Transfer function:

ac_bw.png
                                                                                                                                                            (click to enlarge)

The transfer function was measured by applying a fixed amplitude sine wave to the input, and measuring the peak-to-peak value of the read out waveform with the DRSOsc application.

DC-coupled Version

The DC-coupled version has a slightly higher power consumption since there is a constant current flowing through the output into the DRS4 chip. On the other hand, the bandwidth is a bit higher and the peaking around 400 MHz is a bit smaller. The input is still AC-coupled, so both positive and negative pulses can be accepted. 

dc.png
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             (click to enlarge)

Power supply: +5 V 115 mA

Bandwidth (-3dB): 800 MHz

CMOFS: 1.8 V

Transfer function:

dc_bw.png
                                                                                                                                                              (click to enlarge)

Achievable performance

With the active input stage, much faster rise- and fall times can be achieved. Following picture shows a signal from a external clock having a fall time of about 300 ps being recorded with the AC-coupled version of the active input stage. The fall time of the recorded signal is about 800 ps, which is about the minimum which can be achieved with the AC-coupled version. The DC-coupled version achieves about 700ps.

DRS4_ft_V3.jpg

 Hi, stefan,

     In the DC coupled version of the analog drivers for DRS4 input in Eval. Board V3, you mentioned that CMOFS of THS4508 was set to 1.8V to match the input range of DRS4, however, will this clash with the requirements of  DRS4 input voltage between 0.1 V ~1.5V ? The output of THS4508 can easily rise beyond 1.5V for CMOFS=1.8V. I also noticed the resister paris R13/R15, R14/R16 was added among the output of THS4508 and the inputs of DRS4, were these resister pairs were used to attenuate the level of THS4508 output signal (a half ? ) to match the input requirements of DRS4? Maybe I have some misunderstanding about it.

  121   Mon Jul 4 05:06:00 2011 Jinhong WangFixed Patter Timing Jitter

Stefan Ritt wrote:

Jinhong Wang wrote:

 Hi Stefan, can you give some suggestions on determination of fixed pattern timing jitter of DRS4?  Thanks~

I will prepare some more detailed description of how to do this in the near future, but we are still learning ourselves constantly how to do that better. 


So for the moment I only can recommend you to read the function DRSBoard::CalibrateTiming() and AnalyzeWF(). What you basically do is to define an array of "effective" bin widths t[i]. You start with the nominal bin width (let's say 500ps at 2 GSPS). Now you measure a periodic signal, and look for the zero crossings. If you have a 100 MHz clock, the time between two positive transitions (low-to-high) is 10.000ns. Now you measure the width as seen by the DRS chip, assuming the effective bin widths. The exact zero crossing you interpolate between two samples to improve the accuracy. Now you measure something different, let's say 10.1ns. So you know the ~20 bins between the zero crossings are "too wide", but you don't know which one of them is too wide. So you distribute the "too wide" equally between all bins, that is you decrease the effective width of these bins from 500ps to 500-0.1ns/20=499.995 ps. Then you do this iteratively, that is for all cycles in the waveform, and for many (1000's) of recorded waveforms. It is important that the phase of you measured clock is random, so that all bins are covered equally. Then you realize that the solution oscillates, which you can reduce by using a damping factor (called "damping" in my C code). So you do not correct to 499.995ps, but maybe to 499.999ps. If you iterate often enough, the solution kind of stabilizes.

The attached picture shows the result of such a calibration. Green is the effective bin width which in the end only slightly deviates from 500ps. But the "integral temporal nonlinearity" shows a typical shape for the DRS chip. It's defined as

          n
 Ti[n] = Sum (t[i]-500ps)
         i=0

where t[i] is the effective bin width. So Ti[0] is zero by definition, but the deviation around bin 450 can go up to 1ns at 2 GSPS.

Now you can test you calibration, by measuring again the period of your clock. If you do everything correctly and have a low jitter external clock and no noise on your DRS4 power supply voltages, you should see a residual jitter of about 40ps.

Hope this explanation helps a bit. Let me know if I was not clear enough at some points. 

- Stefan

 Hi, Stefan,

    I noticed other groups of SCA reported the technique to histogram the zero crossings of a sine wave, and use the bin occupancy to derive the effective aperture width.  Recently , I tried this technique to DRS4. In my test, the frequency of the sine wave was selected uncorrelated to the domino frequency.The results were discouraging. Large variations of the domino tap delay was observed.   Besides, I also tried to induce an external trigger, which is uncorrelated to the domino frequency, and histogram the stop positions. Unfortunately, large variations were obtained again. I knew there must be something wrong. Do you have any suggestions?

   The attachment is the histogram of the stop positions (the vertical axis is the bin count, the horizontal axis is the bin number). First, I calculate the ration of each bin count to the total counts, supposed the total count is 10000, count of bin 37 is 12, so the corresponding ratio is 12/10000=0.0012. The bin delay is derived by multiplying its ratio to the whole domino period (1024*1/FSamp, eg., for 5 GSP/s, this period is 200ps *1024). (The bin delay i observed was with an variation of about 30 ps).  If the external trigger is uncorrelated to the domino frequency, so, the stop positions are supposed to distribute equally to all bins? If this is true, can i calculate the bin delay via the histogram ?

   thank you~

                 Wang Jinhong

Attachment 1: hist_stoppos.jpg
hist_stoppos.jpg
  123   Tue Jul 12 09:49:08 2011 Jinhong WangFixed Patter Timing Jitter

Stefan Ritt wrote:

Jinhong Wang wrote:

Stefan Ritt wrote:

Jinhong Wang wrote:

 Hi Stefan, can you give some suggestions on determination of fixed pattern timing jitter of DRS4?  Thanks~

I will prepare some more detailed description of how to do this in the near future, but we are still learning ourselves constantly how to do that better. 


So for the moment I only can recommend you to read the function DRSBoard::CalibrateTiming() and AnalyzeWF(). What you basically do is to define an array of "effective" bin widths t[i]. You start with the nominal bin width (let's say 500ps at 2 GSPS). Now you measure a periodic signal, and look for the zero crossings. If you have a 100 MHz clock, the time between two positive transitions (low-to-high) is 10.000ns. Now you measure the width as seen by the DRS chip, assuming the effective bin widths. The exact zero crossing you interpolate between two samples to improve the accuracy. Now you measure something different, let's say 10.1ns. So you know the ~20 bins between the zero crossings are "too wide", but you don't know which one of them is too wide. So you distribute the "too wide" equally between all bins, that is you decrease the effective width of these bins from 500ps to 500-0.1ns/20=499.995 ps. Then you do this iteratively, that is for all cycles in the waveform, and for many (1000's) of recorded waveforms. It is important that the phase of you measured clock is random, so that all bins are covered equally. Then you realize that the solution oscillates, which you can reduce by using a damping factor (called "damping" in my C code). So you do not correct to 499.995ps, but maybe to 499.999ps. If you iterate often enough, the solution kind of stabilizes.

The attached picture shows the result of such a calibration. Green is the effective bin width which in the end only slightly deviates from 500ps. But the "integral temporal nonlinearity" shows a typical shape for the DRS chip. It's defined as

          n
 Ti[n] = Sum (t[i]-500ps)
         i=0

where t[i] is the effective bin width. So Ti[0] is zero by definition, but the deviation around bin 450 can go up to 1ns at 2 GSPS.

Now you can test you calibration, by measuring again the period of your clock. If you do everything correctly and have a low jitter external clock and no noise on your DRS4 power supply voltages, you should see a residual jitter of about 40ps.

Hope this explanation helps a bit. Let me know if I was not clear enough at some points. 

- Stefan

 Hi, Stefan,

    I noticed other groups of SCA reported the technique to histogram the zero crossings of a sine wave, and use the bin occupancy to derive the effective aperture width.  Recently , I tried this technique to DRS4. In my test, the frequency of the sine wave was selected uncorrelated to the domino frequency.The results were discouraging. Large variations of the domino tap delay was observed.   Besides, I also tried to induce an external trigger, which is uncorrelated to the domino frequency, and histogram the stop positions. Unfortunately, large variations were obtained again. I knew there must be something wrong. Do you have any suggestions?

   The attachment is the histogram of the stop positions (the vertical axis is the bin count, the horizontal axis is the bin number). First, I calculate the ration of each bin count to the total counts, supposed the total count is 10000, count of bin 37 is 12, so the corresponding ratio is 12/10000=0.0012. The bin delay is derived by multiplying its ratio to the whole domino period (1024*1/FSamp, eg., for 5 GSP/s, this period is 200ps *1024). (The bin delay i observed was with an variation of about 30 ps).  If the external trigger is uncorrelated to the domino frequency, so, the stop positions are supposed to distribute equally to all bins? If this is true, can i calculate the bin delay via the histogram ?

   thank you~

                 Wang Jinhong

One obvious problem in your method is your statistics. If you have n hits in a bin of the histogram, the error of n is sqrt(n). So if you measure 100 hits, this is more like 100+-10 hits. If you want a better precision, you need much higher statistics. I myself never used this method, but I attach a typical nonlinearity curve running at 2 GSPS, sot hat you know what you should expect. I do some smoothing between neighbor bins so that they do not scatter too much. As you can see, the integral nonlinearity goes almost up to +-2 ns. This value is smaller at higher sampling speeds.

 - Stefan 

 Thank you, Stefan. It is really kind of you to offer suggestions or comments on our concern. 

Recently, we input a sine wave to our DRS board. DRS works at about 5 GS/s. The frequency varies from 131 MHz to 231MHz. The attached picture shows the reconstructed points of sine wave (vertical is the amplitude, horizontal axis is the point numbers). We noticed that the variation of the length of the zero crossing segments is very large. The max. length is perhaps two times the length of the min. I marked in blue color in the picture.  It means the corresponding sampling interval of the max. is two times of that of the min.  If this is true, DNL of the DRS sampling interval would be very large. We know, for uniform sampling, the length of the zero crossing segments are assumed to be uniform.  Do you have any comments? Thank you~

Attachment 1: 131MHz.jpg
131MHz.jpg
  212   Thu Dec 27 00:12:12 2012 Jinhong Wangvariation of sampling capacitors

Hi Stefan,

A quick question, what is the typical variation of the sampling capacitors in DRS4?  Will this variation be significant to affect your sampling result?

 Best,

Jinhong

  214   Thu Dec 27 18:15:14 2012 Jinhong Wangvariation of sampling capacitors

Stefan Ritt wrote:

Jinhong Wang wrote:

Hi Stefan,

A quick question, what is the typical variation of the sampling capacitors in DRS4?  Will this variation be significant to affect your sampling result?

 Best,

Jinhong 

The capacitors sample the input voltage, not the charge, so the actual size of the capacitors does not matter on first order (the variations might be in the order of 5%). A bigger effect is the variation of the analog switches in the front of the capacitors, which is about 15%. So the actual bandwidth each cell sees varies by maybe 20% (given by the R and the C), but this comes only into play when sampling steep edges.

Stefan

 Great to know this! Thanks~

Jinhong

  215   Fri Feb 1 17:43:48 2013 Jinhong Wangvariation of sampling capacitors

Jinhong Wang wrote:

Stefan Ritt wrote:

Jinhong Wang wrote:

Hi Stefan,

A quick question, what is the typical variation of the sampling capacitors in DRS4?  Will this variation be significant to affect your sampling result?

 Best,

Jinhong 

The capacitors sample the input voltage, not the charge, so the actual size of the capacitors does not matter on first order (the variations might be in the order of 5%). A bigger effect is the variation of the analog switches in the front of the capacitors, which is about 15%. So the actual bandwidth each cell sees varies by maybe 20% (given by the R and the C), but this comes only into play when sampling steep edges.

Stefan

 Great to know this! Thanks~

Jinhong

 Hi Dr. Stefan,

So the sampling capacitors store the input voltage instead of the charge. What about the readout circuits? I saw there is a buffer followed each sampling capacitor. Do you buffer the charge (like a charge sensitive amplifier)  or the voltage? From Fig.12, 14 in datasheet, it seems most probably the readout is a charging or discharging of a capacitor. Could you please add some comments on this? 

Cheers,

Jinhong

  781   Wed Oct 23 17:56:26 2019 John JendzurskiComputing corrected time from binary data...what is t_0,0?

In the equations for computing the corrected time for channels other than channel 1, does anyone know what the term t0,0 refers to?  This is the last term in the last equation on page 24 of DRS4 Evaluation Board User’s Manual, Board Revision 5 as of January 2014, Last revised: April 27, 2016.

Screenshot from User's Manual is attached below.

Thank you!

Attachment 1: Screenshot.png
Screenshot.png
  631   Fri Oct 13 03:39:01 2017 Jonathan WapmanRaspberry Pi Connection Failure

I am currently attempting to use a raspberry pi to connect to the DRS 4 board. I whenever I try to use the DRS Command Line TOol, Revision 21435 to connect to the drs board, I get the error

"musb_open: libusb_open() error -3"

"USB successfully scanned, but no boards found"

"No DRS Boards Found".

I successfully compiled the libusb driver before compiling the drs software 5.0.6, and installed all other listed packages in the install instructions.

  700   Wed Jun 13 13:23:17 2018 Julian KempMaximum analog input voltage

Dear all,

I have been wondering what the maximum analog input voltage for the DRS4 V5 evaluation board is. It came with a sticker indicating that it is "2.5V pk Max". On the other hand, when checking the manual (https://www.psi.ch/drs/DocumentationEN/manual_rev50.pdf), it says maximum allowed is 10V DC or even 30V for short pulses. I foresee an application where I cannot make sure that pulses stay below 2.5V, so the correct value will be quite important for me.

Best,
Julian

  702   Wed Jun 13 16:34:28 2018 Julian KempMaximum analog input voltage

Thank you! That solves my problem.

Stefan Ritt wrote:

In principle the numbers in the manual are correct. But they relate to pulses of a certain length, because the input protection only works for DC voltage and for pulses which are not too long. Since we could not write this all on the label of the board, we decided to put there 100% safe value as a "warning" to people, meaning that if pulses are above 2.5V, they should look into the manual and read the details. 

Stefan

Julian Kemp wrote:

Dear all,

I have been wondering what the maximum analog input voltage for the DRS4 V5 evaluation board is. It came with a sticker indicating that it is "2.5V pk Max". On the other hand, when checking the manual (https://www.psi.ch/drs/DocumentationEN/manual_rev50.pdf), it says maximum allowed is 10V DC or even 30V for short pulses. I foresee an application where I cannot make sure that pulses stay below 2.5V, so the correct value will be quite important for me.

Best,
Julian

 

 

  401   Sun Apr 5 22:16:48 2015 Julien WulfDRS4 Evaluation Board Baseline/Voltage Calibration

Hi,

I`m trying to calibrate my DRS4 evoluation board to an input range of 0-1V but it doesn`t work.

1) First I tried to calibrate it with the drsosc (version 5.0.3) Software. The -0.5V - 0.5V calibration works, but during the 0 - 1V calibration the Software crashes.

2) I also tried to calibrate the input range with a C++ DAQ Package (based on drs_exam). Here the code of the calibration:

    ....

    b->SetInputRange(0.) (Center at 0 V )

    b->CalibrateVolt(NULL);

   ....

   Calibration Works

   ....

   b->SetInputRange(0.5) (Center at 0.5 V )

   b->CalibrateVolt(NULL);

  ....

   Results in: Found 4096 stuck pixels on this board.

Did I do a mistake or is this a normal behaviour of the board? Also the board often crashes and I get a magic number 0000 after restarting the DAQ. Then the board needs to be restarted via pulling the plug. ( I ensured that I terminate the USB connection before I close the program with "delete drs"). Is there a possibility to avoid this error?

My OS: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Ciao,

Julien

  784   Thu May 21 07:18:48 2020 Keita MizukoshiDRS4 Evaluation board control tool 'drscl' with macro file

Dear experts,

 

I would like to use DRS4 evaluation board as DAQ system for small, table-top experiment.

I need waveforms capture as binary file on some trigger based on command line without GUI.

I found `drscl` tool in official software, but it require interactive command. I'd rather use static macro or so on to control DAQ as same behaviour in each time.

I guess, experts are thinking users should develop DAQ code by themselves for their experiment specifically, but my request is very common so someone has already developed these tool.

 

Best regards,

Keita

  785   Thu May 21 07:38:05 2020 Keita MizukoshiType check at DOFrame.h in official software

Hi,

 

I've failured to compile official software. The cause is the following line.

DOFrame.h L.111    bool GetRefclk()        { return m_refClk > 0; }

 

m_refClk is pointer to bool. I guess these line is for null-check of the pointer.

Can I replace the following line as 

bool GetRefclk()        { return m_refClk != nullptr; }

?

The latest compilers may not accept C-style check.

 

My compiler version is

Apple clang version 11.0.3 (clang-1103.0.32.59)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin19.4.0
Thread model: posix
InstalledDir: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin

Best regards,

Keita

  789   Mon May 25 03:36:12 2020 Keita MizukoshiDRS4 Evaluation board control tool 'drscl' with macro file

Thank you very much. That is what I wanted.

Stefan Ritt wrote:

There is an example program in the distribution under software/drscl/drs_exam.cpp which is a stand-alone program to do what you need. It uses the C library coming with the distribution. It configureres the board, defines a trigger, and then writes a few waveforms into a file. You can use it as a starting point for your development. If you need any other language, you have to develop bindings to the C library.

Stefan

Keita Mizukoshi wrote:

Dear experts,

 

I would like to use DRS4 evaluation board as DAQ system for small, table-top experiment.

I need waveforms capture as binary file on some trigger based on command line without GUI.

I found `drscl` tool in official software, but it require interactive command. I'd rather use static macro or so on to control DAQ as same behaviour in each time.

I guess, experts are thinking users should develop DAQ code by themselves for their experiment specifically, but my request is very common so someone has already developed these tool.

 

Best regards,

Keita

 

 

  508   Fri Apr 15 12:58:46 2016 Konstantin GusevDRS4 purchase information

    Hi,

 I can't contact with Anita Van Loon about DSR4 chip's price and delivery.

Did you still sell it? Can you provide me this information?

  563   Fri Nov 18 05:52:45 2016 Kurtis NishimuraChannel offsets in GetTime()

Hello,

I have a question about the GetTime() method in DRS.cpp.  I understand how the DT values are applied for all channels, and I also understand from the evaluation board manual that the timing of each channel is synchronized at sample 0, so samples should really be aligned from channel-to-channel relative to sample 0.

However, DRS.cpp has the following snippet in DrsBoard::GetTime():

   if (channelIndex > 0) {
      // correct all channels to channel 0 (Daniel's method)
      iend = tc >= 700 ? 700+1024 : 700;
      for (i=tc,gt0=0 ; i<iend ; i++)
         gt0 += fCellDT[chipIndex][0][i % 1024];
      
      for (i=tc,gt=0 ; i<iend ; i++)
         gt += fCellDT[chipIndex][channelIndex][i % 1024];
      
      for (i=0 ; i<fChannelDepth ; i++)
         time[i] += (float)(gt0 - gt);
   }

I can see what this is calculating and applying such an offset, but I don't understand why things seem to be referenced to sample 700.  Is there a particular reason why sample 700 is chosen here?  This does not seem like a straightforward application of the attached instructions from the evaluation board user's manual.

Any insight would be much appreciated!

Thanks so much,

-Kurtis

Attachment 1: offsetInstructions.png
offsetInstructions.png
  509   Thu Apr 21 22:16:43 2016 Kyle WeinfurtherNegative fCellDT values from GetTimeCalibration()

Hello Stefan,

I am using four DRS4 v5 eval boards to digitize 16 channels of data. I have recently changed from saving the timing information of the waveform using GetTime() to GetTimeCalibration(). When changing over, I noticed that some values for fCellDT for cell 498 are negative. Over the 16 channels used, 4 of them have negative time bin widths for cell 498 while the other 12 channels are very close to 0 (in the ~10 ps range). One of the eval boards has no negative fCellDT whereas the other three boards have one or two channels with negative values.

Upon further inspection, I checked the time between samples of GetTime() and found the same results in cell 498. After finding this, I did a timing calibration again with CalibrateTiming() even though in a different post on the discussion forum you said it was valid for a wide range of temperatures and a long time (years). This still allowed the negative fCellDT values to persist.

Is this a common occurance? If so, is there a method to fix this issue? Is there a reason for cell 498 to have a small value for fCellDT? I searched the discussion forum and did not find anything relating to this issue.

Attached are a couple waveform traces using GetTime() zoomed in on cell 498.

Thanks,

Kyle Weinfurther

Attachment 1: ch5.png
ch5.png
Attachment 2: ch7.png
ch7.png
Attachment 3: ch9.png
ch9.png
  467   Wed Jan 6 15:51:58 2016 Larry ByarsUse of Channel Cascading in drs_exam.cpp

Hello Stefan,

Here in Rockford, TN we just got a new DRS4 evaluation board (Serail # 2612, Board Type 9, Firmware 21305) which is labeled as combined 2048.

It looks like the drs_exam.cpp only works with 1024 samples per channel. We'd like to be able to get 2048 samples from each of the four channels but I am uncertain what code modifications are necessary support this.

Could you offer a suggestion? I've searched the forum for cascade and read several threads but they are pretty old. One even says it isn't supported in the evaluation board, but I think that is no longer the case.

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Larry Byars

 

  469   Tue Jan 12 15:42:31 2016 Larry ByarsUse of Channel Cascading in drs_exam.cpp

An update. I have been successful in making modifications to drs_exam.cpp so that I can get 2048 samples per channel.. The main changes were to the size of the time_array and wave_array and adding a call to Set ChannelConfig(0,8,4). It was also necessary to change the parameters to GetWave so that the Trigger Cell and WSR values were passed to get the channel combinations correct (2048 channel.ppt).

I've moved on to try to increase the speed of acquisition (I get only about 500 events/sec) and trying to understand the corrections.Working through the source code slowly...

Regards,

Larry Byars

Larry Byars wrote:

Hello Stefan,

Here in Rockford, TN we just got a new DRS4 evaluation board (Serail # 2612, Board Type 9, Firmware 21305) which is labeled as combined 2048.

It looks like the drs_exam.cpp only works with 1024 samples per channel. We'd like to be able to get 2048 samples from each of the four channels but I am uncertain what code modifications are necessary support this.

Could you offer a suggestion? I've searched the forum for cascade and read several threads but they are pretty old. One even says it isn't supported in the evaluation board, but I think that is no longer the case.

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Larry Byars

 

 

  619   Fri Jun 16 17:34:20 2017 Laura GonellaDriver installation on Windows 10

Hello,

I am trying to get a DRS4 board to run on Windows 10. I am having problems with the driver installation. I am getting the follwoing message

"There is no driver selected for the device information set or element"

I had specified the path to look for the driver as C:\ProgramFilesx86\DRS\driver\. I also tried the option to look online for the driver. None works. Can anyone help?

Thanks,

Laura

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